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  Woman's Prison, New Orleans, Louisiana, 1965

                     

                    

 

                     

                Leonard Freed

              All I have to Offer

                  
                  1 March - 1 June 2008

                                   
                       Enter


 

 

 

 

 

 “No more pictures,” were the last words spoken by Leonard Freed to his wife, Brigitte, when he passed away at their home in upstate New York in 2006.  Leonard Freed had given us all he had to offer.  But what he left behind was an archive of an estimated million negatives and a wealth of powerful, emotional images that helped us better understand the truth about who we are and our sense of belonging within a community of man. 

Our show includes numerous unique and never-before-published images from Freed’s 50+ year career, as well as a large collection of contact sheets from his seminal work Black in White America and Police Work.  These contact sheets are not only of historical importance, but represent a unique opportunity for the photographer, collector and historian alike to better understand the man behind the lens as he worked toward the perfect image, or what Cartier-Bresson would define as ‘the decisive moment.’  Freed_contact_wall.html  Also on view are a number of Freed’s well-worn Leica cameras and assorted documentation of his career.

“Ultimately, photography is about who you are,” said Freed.  “It’s the seeking of truth in relation to yourself.  And seeing truth becomes a habit.”  For visitors to our gallery, Freed’s photographs represent memories of shared times -- difficult and troubling, beautiful and sweet -- and beckon us to conceive of what promises to be a future of hope.